This site discusses Phimosis, Frenulum Breve and the Epithelium, and their relationship to Male Initiation and Identity.
Much modern medical information on circumcision (from popular literature to reports in medical journals), recommends that the best care for a foreskin is to leave it alone. These reports are all based on Øster's misinterpreted study. Øster made his report following 7 years of education and monitoring. Such care and attention obviously results in less problems.

updates and supporting education on new site : Phimosis.cloud
GENERAL INTRODUCTION
TO PREVENTION

There are thousands of forms of sexual disturbance and huge volumes of literature have discussed theories and principles which baffle common sense.

Here we are discussing a simple physical restriction of the external male sexual organ. Among all the problems which people have this must be the most ignored and the easiest to solve.


"It would be best for parents to check their son's erections during infancy" Dr.med. Jenny Splieth (22) - This check is very easy to perform: During bath time erections - simply look : Is the foreskin moving freely?

If parents made an early check on a boy's erect penis, this would be far more effective and efficient than a doctor's check on the boy's flaccid penis.

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Routine Medical Checks

Routine pre-puberty medical examinations currently check such things as eyesight, hearing, heart and lungs and for the proper descent of the testes. To this should now be added at least one check to ensure that the boy does not suffer from adhesions, phimosis or a tight frenulum.

The boy should be asked to retract his own foreskin to the extent that the frenulum can be checked. (In addition the circumcised boy must be checked for skin-bridges and frenulum breve). This check is necessary before puberty in order to minimise the amount of treatment required after puberty, once problems have arisen.

A medical check would be most profitable as regularly as other organs were checked, not only before puberty, but also after puberty. With our present cultural attitudes on preventative medicine, it would be appropriate if checking became recognised and understood as routine procedure - and became a central part of our cultures initiation into manhood.

This theme is developed under: The validity of routine checks and education

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The Facts of Life

It is normal for infants to have erections and, Among most normal boys the foreskin retracts automatically when erect.

Education: Since January 1997 pictures of foreskin retraction are available on internet. It would be realistic to print pictures of the erect penis showing the retraction of the foreskin in books on sexual education, this would minimise the necessity to find education through pornography.
Facts of Life

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The Optimal Way to Check

The optimal practical idea is suggested by Dr. med Jenny Splieth.. "Mothers should check this, they see their childrens erections" and again, "It would be best for parents to check their son's erections during infancy ... this would be simplest to do at bath times." (22)

Doctors are usually unable to check a child`s erection and thus are unable to see the effects of, for example, a relative phimosis or frenulum breve. It is easy (and I would argue as natural as bathing him), to check your own son for problems. This involves simple observation of the spontaneous bath time erections every boy has, if he is able to freely retract and replace his own foreskin then he is in good health.

Parents have asked me : If a boy is (unsexually) playing with his erect penis (e.g. during bathing times, at one year old), does this mean that he's healthy? The answer is: Yes! and this must be the best way to check. Simply look : Is the foreskin moving freely?

If parents made an early check on a boy's erect penis, this would be far more effective and efficient than a doctor's check on the boy's flaccid penis. If after three years old a boys foreskin does not retract, he needs encouragement.